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Meet the Psychopaths - Netflix

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Three-part documentary series examining the common traits of psychopaths.

Meet the Psychopaths - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2015-12-08

Meet the Psychopaths - Seven Psychopaths - Netflix

Seven Psychopaths is a 2012 dark comedy crime film written and directed by Martin McDonagh. It stars Colin Farrell, Sam Rockwell, Woody Harrelson, and Christopher Walken, with Tom Waits, Abbie Cornish, Olga Kurylenko, and Željko Ivanek in supporting roles. The film marks the second collaboration among McDonagh, Farrell, and Ivanek, following the director's In Bruges (2008). The film was a co-production of the United States and the United Kingdom. Seven Psychopaths had its world premiere on 7 September 2012 at the Toronto International Film Festival. It was released in the United States and Canada on 12 October 2012, and in the United Kingdom on 5 December 2012.

Meet the Psychopaths - Critical response - Netflix

Seven Psychopaths received positive reviews from critics. Review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a score of 82%, based on 202 reviews, with an average rating of 7.1/10. The site's critical consensus reads, “Seven Psychopaths delivers sly cinematic commentary while serving up a heaping helping of sharp dialogue and gleeful violence.” At Metacritic, which assigns a weighted mean rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the film holds a score of 66 out of 100, based on 43 critics, indicating “generally favorable reviews.” Eric Kohn of IndieWire gave the film a positive review and a “A-” grade, praising McDonagh's writing, stating that it “hits a unique pitch between dark, bloody satire and interpersonal conflicts that makes his finest work play like a combination of Quentin Tarantino and Aaron Sorkin.” About the film itself, he wrote: “A less controlled and slapdash character piece than In Bruges, McDonagh's new movie benefits greatly from a plethora of one-liners that toy with crime movie clichés in the unlikely context of writerly obsessions.” Claudia Puig of USA Today also gave the film a positive review, writing that “men in movies are often just overgrown boys, and Seven Psychopaths is out to prove it – in the most twisted, hilarious way possible.” Roger Ebert of Chicago Sun-Times gave the film three-and-a-half stars out of four. He praised the performances of main cast members and McDonagh's writing, stating that “Walken sometimes leans toward self-parody, but here his performance has a delicate, contained strangeness. All of the actors are good, and Farrell wisely allows the showier performances to circle around him. Like any screenwriter – like Tarantino, for example, who is possibly McDonagh's inspiration here – he brings these people into being and stands back in amazement.” About the film, he added: “This is a delightfully goofy, self-aware movie that knows it is a movie.” Lisa Schwarzbaum of Entertainment Weekly gave the film a “B+” grade, stating: “An energetically demented psycho-killer comedy set in faux-noir L.A., Seven Psychopaths rollicks along to the unique narrative beat and language stylings of Anglo-Irish writer-director Martin McDonagh (In Bruges), channeling Quentin Tarantino.” David Rooney of The Hollywood Reporter praised the performances of the main cast members, he stated: “As creatively bankrupt Marty, Farrell is in subdued mode here, his performance largely defined by the endless expressivity of his eyebrows. He serves as an excellent foil for Rockwell, whose line readings continually dance between knowingness and idiocy, and Walken, who ventures as far into deadpan as you can go while remaining conscious. And Harrelson has fun contrasting his devotion to Bonny with his contempt for humanity.” He wrote about the film that “while it's way behind the Pulp Fiction curve, Seven Psychopaths can be terrifically entertaining.” Catherine Shoard of The Guardian gave the film four stars out of five, indicating a positive review, she wrote: “There are scenes of complete brilliance, Walken is better than he's been in years, cute plot loops and grace notes.” Peter Travers of Rolling Stone gave the film three stars out of four, stating: “Blood splatters, heads explode, and McDonagh takes sassy, self-mocking shots at the very notion of being literary in Hollywood. It's crazy-killer fun.” Ty Burr of Boston Globe also gave the film three stars out of four, stating that the film is “absurdly entertaining even after it disappears up its own hindquarters in the last act, and it gives some of our weirder actors ample room to play.” Michael Phillips of Chicago Tribune gave the film three stars out of four, writing that “the result is a clever, violent daydream. But McDonagh's skill behind the camera has grown considerably since In Bruges. And the way he writes, he's able to attract the ideal actors into his garden of psychopathology.” Dana Stevens of Slate magazine gave the film a positive review, stating: “It's at once a gangster movie, a buddy comedy, and a meta-fictional exploration of the limits of both genres - and if that sounds impossible to pull off, well, McDonagh doesn't, quite. But the pure sick brio of Seven Psychopaths takes it a long way.” Richard Corliss of Time magazine also gave the film a positive review, writing that “small in stature but consistently entertaining, Seven Psychopaths is a vacation from consequence for the Tony- and Oscar-winning author, and an unsupervised play date for his cast of screw-loose stars.” James Berardinelli of ReelViews gave the film two-and-a-half stars out of four, stating: “On balance, one could argue that Seven Psychopaths warrants a better rating than a mediocre **1/2, but the aftertaste is so bitter that it diminishes the sweetness that started off the meal.” Peter Debruge of Variety magazine gave the film a mixed review, stating that “the film's overall tone is so cartoony, it's easy to imagine someone spinning off a macabre animated series of the same name.....” and that “compared to McDonagh's best work for stage (The Lieutenant of Inishmore) and screen (In Bruges), Seven Psychopaths feels like either an older script knocking around the bottom of a drawer or a new one hastily tossed off between more ambitious projects.” Kevin Jagernauth of The Playlist also gave the film a mixed review, stating that “somewhat spastic and overcooked, Seven Psychopaths might have a few too many.”

Meet the Psychopaths - References - Netflix