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Fast N' Loud: Demolition Theater - Netflix

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Richard Rawlins and Aaron Kaufman drop their tools and kick back to share the most amazing and funniest video clips collected from around the world. They'll be joined in the studio by members of the Gas Monkey crew, as well as special guests from the videos themselves. Videos include an Australian stuntwoman woman doing an unintentional 30 foot faceplant on her motorcycle, as well as some guys demonstrating how not to light a bonfire in the woods. Plus, witness the world's worst cat burglar, a truck that refuses to stay parked, and a car wash being totally destroyed.

Fast N' Loud: Demolition Theater - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2014-04-14

Fast N' Loud: Demolition Theater - Shrek - Netflix

Shrek is a 2001 American computer animated fantasy comedy film loosely based on the 1990 fairytale picture book of the same name by William Steig. It was directed by Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson in their directorial debut, and stars the voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz, and John Lithgow. The film somewhat serves as a parody of other films adapted from numerous fairy tales, mainly animated Disney films. In the story, Shrek (Myers) finds his swamp overrun by fairy tale creatures who have been banished there by order of the evil Lord Farquaad (Lithgow). In order to get his swamp back, Shrek makes a deal with Farquaad to bring him a queen in exchange for the deed for his swamp. Shrek sets out with a talking Donkey (Murphy) and rescues Princess Fiona (Diaz). As they take Fiona to Farquaad so she can marry him, Shrek starts to fall in love with the princess and soon discovers a secret about her. The rights to Steig's book were originally bought by Steven Spielberg in 1991, before the founding of DreamWorks, when he thought about making a traditionally animated film based on the book. However, John H. Williams convinced him to bring the film to DreamWorks in 1994, the time the studio was founded, and the film was put quickly into active development by Jeffrey Katzenberg after the rights were bought by the studio in 1995. Chris Farley was originally cast as the voice for the title character, recording about 80%–90% of his dialogue. After Farley died in 1997 before he could finish his work, Mike Myers was brought in to voice the character, who, after his first recording, decided to record his voice in a Scottish accent. The film was also originally planned to be motion-captured, but after poor results, the studio decided to recruit Pacific Data Images to help Shrek get its final computer-animated look. Shrek established DreamWorks Animation as a prime competitor to Pixar in feature film computer animation, and grossed $484.4 million at the worldwide box office against its $60 million production budget. It was acclaimed as an animated film worthy of adult interest, with many adult-oriented jokes and themes but a simple enough plot and humor to appeal to children. Shrek won the first ever Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, and was also nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay. It was also nominated for six British Academy of Film and Television Arts awards, including the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role for Eddie Murphy for his voice performance as Donkey, and won the BAFTA Award for Best Adapted Screenplay. The film's success prompted DreamWorks to create three sequels—Shrek 2 (2004), Shrek the Third (2007), and Shrek Forever After (2010), two holiday specials—Shrek the Halls (2007) and Scared Shrekless (2010), and a spin-off film—Puss in Boots (2011). A fifth film, planned as the last of the series, was cancelled in 2009, with the announcement that the fourth film would conclude the series. However, the fifth film was revived in 2016, which is currently in development. The film's success also inspired other merchandise, such as video games, a stage musical, and a comic book adaptation by Dark Horse Comics. The film's main title character was awarded his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in May 2010.

Fast N' Loud: Demolition Theater - Development - Netflix

At the time DreamWorks was founded, producer John H. Williams got hold of the book from his children and when he brought it to DreamWorks, it caught Jeffrey Katzenberg's attention and the studio decided to make it into a film. Recounting the inspiration of making the film, Williams said:

“Every development deal starts with a pitch and my pitch came from my then kindergartner, in collaboration with his pre-school brother. Upon our second reading of Shrek, the kindergartner started quoting large segments of the book pretending he could read them. Even as an adult, I thought Shrek was outrageous, irreverent, iconoclastic, gross, and just a lot of fun. He was a great movie character in search of a movie.”

After buying the rights to the film, Katzenberg quickly put it in active development in November 1995. Steven Spielberg had thought about making a traditionally animated film adaption of the book before, when he bought the rights to the book in 1991 before the founding of DreamWorks, where Bill Murray would play Shrek and Steve Martin would play Donkey. In the beginning of production, co-director Andrew Adamson refused to be intimidated by Katzenberg and had an argument with him how much should the film appeal to adults. Katzenberg wanted both audiences, but he deemed some of Adamson's ideas, such as adding sexual jokes and Guns N' Roses music to the soundtrack, to be too outrageous. Adamson and Kelly Asbury joined in 1997 to co-direct the film. However, Asbury left a year later for work on the 2002 film Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, and was replaced with story artist Vicky Jenson. Both Adamson and Jenson decided to work on the film in half, so the crew could at least know who to go to with specific detail questions about the film's sequences; “We both ended up doing a lot of everything,” Adamson said. “We're both kinda control freaks, and we both wanted to do everything.” Some early sketches of Shrek's house were done between 1996 and 1997 using Photoshop, with the sketches showing Shrek first living in a garbage dump near a human village called Wart Creek. It was also thought one time that he lived with his parents and kept rotting fish in his bedroom. Donkey was modeled after Pericles (born 1994; also known as Perry), a real miniature donkey from Barron Park in Palo Alto, California. Raman Hui, supervising animator of Shrek, stated that Fiona “wasn't based on any real person.” and he did many different sketches for her. He had done over 100 sculptures of Fiona before the directors chose the final design. In early development, the art directors visited Hearst Castle, Stratford upon Avon, and Dordogne for inspiration. Art Director Douglas Rogers visited a magnolia plantation in Charleston, South Carolina for inspiration of Shrek's swamp. Planned characters not used in the film include Goldilocks and Sleeping Beauty.

Fast N' Loud: Demolition Theater - References - Netflix